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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
.org. >> good afternoon, everyone, almost good evening, and welcome to san francisco city hall. i'm supervisor scott wiener. i have the honor of representing district 8 including the castro on the board of supervisors. and which district are formerly represented by harvey milk. supervisor olague likes to remind me we share the district 5 represented by milk. and we're here today to remember supervisor harvey milk and mayor george moscone who were brutally assassinated decades ago. and we gather every year to remember, and not just to remember and to mourn, but also to remember the positives and to remember frankly both of these great men and what they contributed to our community. you know, with respect to harvey milk, there will never, ever be another harvey milk in our community in terms of what he represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into offi
. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quita while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and mh more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild o
the country help to organize recovery month community events and celebrations in september, in cities and towns across the nation. these events bring together the courageous people in recovery, the caring service providers that work tirelessly to support people in recovery, and the family and friends who are so vital in making recovery a reality. this year, the efforts of thousands of individuals throughout the country produce more than a thousand events nationwide, supporting our 2011 theme, "join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone." these recovery month events confirm that we are making great progress in building strong recovery communities. for everyone to be successful over the long run, we must support people in recovery, not only with our encouraging words but also with housing, education, and employment. recovery month events make the faces of recovery visible in the community, highlighting the fact that people in recovery are our family members, friends, and neighbors. and it underscores the need for ongoing support for those who have beat addiction and mental
years and exchange oragami decorations and kind of a symbolic friendship act here in city hall and don't forget that san francisco is where the united nations is was founded. one more thing that was very interesting to me this year the council general's wife coordinated the gathering of wishes for the tree of hope for 40 other consulates around the globe. >> thank you for doing that. the mayor of san francisco, the council general of japan and his name is... wait a minute, i have it. his name is heroshi, imamata. >> happy holidays everyone, welcome to the great city of san francisco, that dress, donna will make santa claus stay up all night. any way, i want to welcome everybody again to city hall, and to view our wonderful, wonderful tree of hope. it is something that i enjoy every year that it has been here and i tell you when it was announced that this was the tallest, largest tree of hope in the united states, if not in the world, i also wanted to say my very first thought was san francisco has always the biggest hearts in the world, thanks to all of you. thank you, donna, for your
building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million pe
, but it's not going to work and today i will settle formality city librarian luis herr ra and i would like to welcome each and every one of you to our ceremony today. this is indeed a milestone because it's not only the beginning of construction to a new new library, but it's the end of the program, which means it's a long time coming. {$}[ applause ], what it means that this is the last project and i want to especially thank. north beach community for your patience, for your persistence and your perseverance to have the state-of-the-art library here in your neighborhood. [ applause ] thank you so much very much. [ applause ] >> let's talk a little bit about this library. it's going to be 60% larger than the other library that sits over there. 60% larger. that means more books, more media, wonderful technology, wi-fi access. if you envision this space and if you look that way you have a wonderful adult area. as you walk in from the mason street side, you have an amazing teen center for all the young adults. absolutely. yelling back here, [ applause ] . that was our deputy city librarian,
that i'm not qualified to talk about, i'm strictly a push to talk guy. we know as a city when the earth moves, things fall, we get a lot of rubble. that's going to be one of our critical, critical things we have to do. we have to be able to move material and personnel and one of the ways we're going to be doing that is how do we actually get the debris off the road so we can put things back to work. so that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful year. that's what we did as far as the field exercises. next year i don't know what's next, we're going to explore the lessons learned from this one, we've already learned a bunch, they're going to talk about this shortly then learn what are the next scenarios we can challenge people with. it pro
recently been experiencing in the southeastern part of the city. thank you very much, mayor. mayor lee: thank you. i want to also express my appreciation for the other supervisors that are here and also have been engaged with us. certainly, supervisor olague is here. supervisor wiener is here. there is an ongoing discussion about public safety. i also want to express my deep appreciation for our city's cloete community, the interfaith council, and my thanks for today, the pastor and his church and his staff for welcoming us all here in this very integral part of our city and all the other clergy that are here as well as the naacp, represented by a pastor reverend amos brown and his staff, along with the police chief, or public safety clusters, juvenile probation, a deprivation, community-based agencies, city services office, and the number of community groups that have engaged me and my staff and all of the supervisors are on this very serious question around public safety in our city. many of you have known and heard in the past couple of months my very deep concerns about our safety,
to in the city hall in this one rotunda or one of the offices and so many wonderful weddings and so many celebrations and so many heart rending speeches and yes, some sad occasions too. all a part of our community and our beautiful city. as you look around this room tonight, what a diverse combination we have. it makes me smile, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and i just have to go slowly, they
of the activities are taking place in the city. but he's also the president of the board of supervisors. i'd like you to welcome david chiu. (applause) >> glad to have you here. >> glad to be here. good morning. on behalf of the san francisco legislative body, our board of supervisors, i want to welcome you to our city of san francisco. and i first want to also echo what our fire chief just said as far as welcoming all of you who have been serving our country and the world in uniform. i want to thank those of you who helped to run our first responder departments around the bay area. i want to thank those of you who are our volunteers, our note programs here. and of course want to thank and welcome our san francisco secretary of state and the woman who manages and orders around that secretary of state, charles m. charlotte schultz. (applause) >> now, this week as you know, there is a lot going on here. and in addition to welcoming you here at the scenier leader seminar, i want to tell you we were so excited that the sls would be here that we decided this weekend to also require the americas cup to
likely to be truant and/or at risk of not finishing high school. whatever we can as an entire city to get them across the high-school finish line. if we can do that, all those other numbers go away. think about the money that could be productively spent towards ending violence in the long-term here in san francisco. i cannot tell you how much i appreciate the mayor and the board of supervisors' leadership and the friendship and love that is in the room. we really, really appreciate the help. thank you. [applause] >> next, we will be bringing up the director of adult probation, chief windy still -- wendy still. [applause] >> thank you. adult probation department is working to create short and long term effective intervention to provide offenders with meaningful opportunities to change their lives, which will also reduce crime and victimization. we have to create a way out. our public safety and community-based organization partnership will include a continuum of employment, education, housing, mental health services that will enable individuals to break the -- break free from violence and
. everybody dance. (drums). go dancing rocking san francisco city hall indian way. how about a big round of applause for all our dancers? all right. [applause] all right. once again let's hear it for your singers, our dancers from everywhere here in the san francisco bay area. [applause] all right. good singing. good dancing. posting the eagle staff at this time. be shout out to larry harrison for taking care of our eagle staff. you maybe seated. calling up to the podium at this time michael lupdtin and vice president of the marketing and branding for this station. >> hi everyone. can you hear me? hello everyone. i am from kqmd and i wanted to welcome you to this eighth annual indian heritage celebration. we are honored to be honoring four heroes from the community who have tirelessly worked throughout the year to provide the kind of service that admissible media is about and engaged community and robust heritage is about. nominated by community leaders they have worked at the grass-roots level and share the highest values we all share. as a public supported media organizat
from now to the end of january, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resources with them. and it is just like japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm naomi kelly, city administrator for the city and county of san francisco and it's an honor to be participating in this important panel discussion on the uss macon island. over the course of the next 50 minutes, we will be going to focus one of our -- we're going to be focused on one of the most important elements of our city and that's the resill yepbs of our life line. i am joined by a prestigious panel of experts who i believe have a keen insight sbat resill yepbs of the capacities we will be relying on heavily in moving forward post a disaster. here with me today is kirk johnson, to my left, vice president of gas transmissions from pacific gas and electric. next to him is don boland, executive director of california utilities emergency association. next to him is david brig, regional and local water system manager for the san francisco public utilities commission and fi
think you mentioned this earlier, we assumed that all of the city's primary communications were online and operational. we used 800 megahertz push to talk radios here. we assumed that system was online and operational and i think next year it would be a really good exercise for us to pull that communications capability out of the picture and use military assets. i think we're going to have a lot of lessons learned out of that activity and it would be a good exercise for the city personnel to understand how they would operate using the military aid. >> i think one of the things that i wrote in my after action report it my boss was about training. we actually have an acu1,000 type capability in pendleton and that is a piece of equipment that bee don't train with routinely the expeditionary folks. i think there is an opportunity in training, it's great when marines get to see the gear and do that type of cross banding we spoke about. civilian authority operates in 700-800 megahertz range. we know fires happen a lot and we're often asked to support so training is a big recommendati
those agencies determine what those requirements are, they are given back to the city who employs those as they think they need to be deployed because, again, they are the eyes and understand the local situation. i think going through this that the navy and the marine corps, we're used to being in charge whenever we show up and we're not going to be in this situation. i think it's important for us to understand that and we do and i think we, if we were employed in this certainly would understand that particular chain of command and would be able to fit right in and execute as required by the local situation. >> let me reiterate that the local authorities need to know that the emergency managers, the first responders, are there to be in charge to run things in their local disaster. everyone else that rolls in behind are there to enable them to do that, to manage to get back to normal so all the forces that roll in can finally leave. the emergency managers need to remain in control, they need to be situationally aware, they need to be in communicate with their forces, they need to unders
on the san andreas fault. we're working with other city departments so they know what to expect from us. it's been an education process. as we started down the road i think there was an expectation all water and sewer was going to be in operation in san francisco after an ert quake. that probably is not going to happen. it's a little bit different having several blocks in your population out of water versus out of electricity or gas or cell phone service. it's a little bit different level of emergency. after an earthquake what we're designing for is to have the high level fire system more or less immediately. there may be homes, individual service connections, which could be out of water for quite some time and that's where my utility has to interface with other departments to make sure we're getting water to people through humanitarian stations, red cross, mutual aid is a huge part of this with our federal and state partners. but those hand off points after a major event and educating ourselves what we're doing and not doing is a big part of the life line process that naomi is running
as a city, as a community, what can we do to help you? and the answer was, you know, we really need equipment. i said, all right, well, i can see what i can do, there's a couple networks. and what we really would like is a way to help the community because as you've heard mentioned here a few times, this idea of post traumatic stress, it was prevalent. you can feel it. people were -- this was a month or so, two months after. every time there was an aftershock people were on edge. we were on edge, for crying out loud. we're wandering around under this rubble, i'm looking back at these pictures now and thinking, what am i, an idiot? these buildings are going to come down. if you look at these pictures commerce is taking place under it where in america they would close down the block. this where my family has always had its stall. we got to make a living. what else can we do? we don't have any medical training which kind of -- okay, you are fire fighters, i figured you had some. that was my naivete at the moment, i think i was a little overwhelmed myself. that's still my
and he touches john's heart and then he moves away towards the city hall of john's memory and john set the stairs in the way that george did, cocky and sexy, cruel as all get out. and then the song ends. and i notice the woman sitting next to me crying. and after the play is over, after the standing ovation of tony's brave and beautiful play, as people start to leave the theater, this woman, she remains in her chair and it seems she cannot move. i gently asked her if she's all right. and she nods. and she says without looking at me because she couldn't look at me, "i got to see my mayor again." so, maybe through art we can see again. about a month ago i braved going to the sf moment to check out the infamous bust of my dad and all i could remember growing up were the images of that controversial pedestal of gunshots and twinkies and don't think i didn't smile when i heard hostess went under. [laughter] (applause) but when i went to see the bust for that first time, a bust that i have to admit captured george's mile wide grin and dramatically imperfect teeth, i saw on the pedestal s
movies and honors indian people like tonight? this is a great, great honor to be here in city hall of san francisco. the person that nominated me for this award is laverne roberts. maybe some of you knew her as laverne morrisy. she went home to her reservation. she is piute and went to her home. where is her home? >> [inaudible] >> in earring ton nevada. we went there once and she has a beautiful house and live there is and now she is even running for the council of her tribe. laverne was going to surprise me and be here this evening, but she had an outbreak of one of her illnesses. her foot started to bleed and now she has to be on crutches for a while, so she had to turn in her plane ticket and her taxi fare, but otherwise she would have been here tonight and many of us know laverne and we would like to say a prayer that she gets better soon and can come and see us. this is for laverne. yes. please let's clap our hands for laverne. [applause] >> thank you. laverne roberts was honored here in this space two years ago. thank you laverne. and i think i can say a lot more about
of tsunami. we have that in all our coastal cities. infrastructure regulations, you cannot build anything which is not 7.5, or less than a 7.5. if there is a mother who has no diapers and no food for their children, 24 hours and everything is, you know, no water, no nothing, people tend to go to a supermarket, absolutely broken, no one is in there, and start looting. so -- and it's something that you have to understand. so usually police, the armed forces time to react is very, very important. and in navy aspects we have a plan and we put that plan in effect and it works so it's very good, this kind of meetings because that is exactly what you are doing. naval effects as usual prove their flexibility and their capacity to remain in the affected areas for a long time without any logistical support so we can do a lot. that plan put the surface units in less than 24 hours. naval doctrine was highly effective. most of our ships -- the earthquake was at 3.34 and most of our ships get underway at about 4:00 or 4.10. one of them without a captain, he is not a captain any more, but all people
here with a manager at the heart of the city farmer's market in san francisco. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80. >> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank you for speaking with us. are you on the web? >> yes, hocfarmersmarket.org. >> check them out. thank you. >> welcome. the dish is ready. >> it looks and smells amazing. >> thank you. it was not easy to meet the $20 budget. i checked everybody out and found some great produce. really lovely seafood. i think that you are going to love it. >> do not be shy. cyou know this can run you $35 to $45 for a bowl, so it is great you did this for $20. >> this will feed four to six people. >> not if you invite me over for dinner. i am ready to dig in. >> i hope you'll love it. >> mmm. >> what do yo
with the city. fema is well represented and we have several defense coordinating officers here over the past couple of days. certainly the california national guard is represented heavily here. obviously they are going to be the first guys to respond to a disaster and they have several interesting roles not only from a state perspective but as they get federalized or with the dual status commander managing federal response and federal authorities of military authorities flowing in. and most significantly, we're represented today with the commander of northern command, general jackoby. as you know, defense report to civil authorities is not a primary mission area for the department of defense. we have codified it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and ver
a robust provider system, and you do, one that the cities and counties and states should be proud of. because they get it. they get it out here. but the hospitals, they will have to figure it out. but what if you are a country and all of a sudden you have an earthquake and by the way the one thing you need most because of that earthquake, the hospital infrastructure, is gone. can we describe a scenario that could be like that? i remember when i was in college a popular thing was the national lampoon and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gon
are what's purchased for all city institutions and city agencies and offices, so this approved list has the list of like light bulbs and commuters and cleaning products and stuff like that, toilet paper, you know, that are either less toxic or less straining of resources and so that approved list can be one of the tools that you can use in fire houses, in this office, probably a lot of that's already happening, and across all of san francisco offices and agencies. so, any ideas before we open for questions about little things in the fire houses that you would want to see happen or commitments that you can make in those spaces? yes? >> [inaudible]. i probably don't need a microphone, but -- >> they need it. >> maybe i need to turn it on. it's on. can you hear me? okay. janet, as articulated by a couple of people already, one of our issues is diesel exhausts in the fire houses and cal ocean does require that we have exhaust extractors and over the years that i have been in the fire department, those extractors have used sometimes and haven't worked other times, i have heard if you have do
guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor frequency. but from a command control perspective, we're fair
of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san francisco. these are names we should never forget. we'll see another names as they serve our great city and become our great local heroes. many of these names now on this very wonderful interactive board. tonight celebrate. celebrate the whole month and make sure we remember our heroes and make sure we honor the current ones t
, but you can actually see it on the outside. so, when people are walking around the city they can actually see the green and environmental aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen, we are performing excerpts from composer naverez, our christ
helen diller. together with the clean and safe neighborhood parks fund and the city's general fund. >> 4. 3. 2. 1. [applause] >> the playground is broken into three general areas. one for the preschool set, another for older
a couple of city folks. where is greg scott? gret get up here. greg, get up here. i want to point out jill, karen. jill is the deputy chief librarian and karen, these two women are the fairy godmothers of this project. we would not be here without all the people that you heard from, but we would not be here without them. give thermometer a big round of applause. [ applause ] >> we have also got on city staff our aquatic director greg scott. [ applause ] >> and let's see, who else did we get up here? huh? mindy. mindy is on my list. i am the last speaker. they are going to try to limit me to the public hearing three minutes and i'm going to try to stick to that, probably not. [ [ laughter ] after i'm finished we're going to turn some dirt. we have a food truck because we deposit want anybody hungry. you guys patronize them if you will. mel sharp and his band are going to be back playing after the speeches. so hang around and party down. i just have a few people that i need to thank. [ laughter ] i will do the short list. of course the mayor. mayor lee has had a lot of celebrating to do
, maybe i would have one. >> it is going to be a great ceremony at city hall, look around, if you have been here you know what a beautiful honored spot we are in, if you have never been to this city hall, it is yours, come by some times, there are meetings going on and business happening but also celebrations of all kinds. tonight is one of those celebrations, we are going to be lighting the tree here at the top here. the beautiful tree of hope. and we have some more entertainment for you before we get to the program and a little bit more music and some of you are mildly singing along. no minds if you sing along as long as you know the words and sing. >> tammy hall, an accomplished key board artist and she is going to play for a little bit. tammy hall, everyone. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] . >> no wonder she is all over town, tammy hall on the electric piano. and let's add another mix to it, and we have a very talented vocalist who is also everywhere i see. i turn the paper and there she is, let's welcome veronica clout. >> thank you. [ applause ] ♪ ♪i can only give you love t
that? >> behind the city, behind the houses, behind those hills. the see any more hills? >> these kids are wonderful. they get to explore, they get to see different things. >> we let them explore a little bit. they get their best. if their parents ever ask, we can learn -- they can say that they learned about the depth of field or the rule of thirds or that the shadows can give a good contrast. some of the things they come up with are fantastic. that is what we're trying to encourage. these kids can bring up the creativity and also the love for photography. >> a lot of people come into my classes and they don't feel like they really are creative and through the process of working and showing them and giving them some tips and ideas. >> this is kind of the best kept secret. you should come on and take a class. we have orientations on most saturdays. this is a really wonderful location and is the real jewel to the community. >> ready to develop your photography skills? the harvey milk photo center focuses on adult classes. andsa
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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